Book resources 2018-07-11T09:32:08+00:00

Book Resources

Here you can find the Acknowledgments, the Appendix, the Bibliography and the Illustrations of our book…

We want to thank our early reviewers, who were courageous enough to look at a premature version of our chapters (in alphabetical order): Eric Abelen, Bjarte Bogsnes, Andrew Buck, Gerard Endenburg, Hendrik Esser, Marc Evers, Aimee Groth, Azy Groth, Michael Herman, Diana Larsen, Evan Leybourn, Yves Lin, Sandy Mamoli, Steve Morlidge, Christa Preisendanz, Annewiek Reijmer. We are really thankful for all these great and serious comments. We incorporated many of them. Thanks to all of you, sharing your experiences in an insights box: Eric Abelen, Bjarte Bogsnes, Hendrik Esser, Michael Herman, Jez Humble, Anders Ivarsson, Todd Kromann, Tracy Kunkler, Diana Larsen, Yves Lin, Sandy Mamoli, Pieter van der Meché, Johanna Rothman, James Shore, and Karen Stephenson.

The members of the Supporting Agile Adoption initiative of the Agile Alliance made a great contribution to our work as both creative thinkers and as a sounding board. Thank you: Eric Abelen, Ray Arrell, Bjarte Bogsnes, Jens Coldewey, Esther Derby, Almir Drugovic, Hendrik Esser, Israel Gat, Don Gray, Michael Hamman, Jorgen Hesselberg, Anders Ivarsson, Bill Joiner, Boris Kneisel, Diana Larsen, Pieter van der Meché, Claudia Melo, Heidi Musser, Jaana Nyfjord, Ken Power, Michael Sahota, George Schlitz, James Shore, Dave Snowden, Rhea Stadick, Kati Vilkki. In this respect we also want to thank the Agile Alliance for supporting this initiative.

Special thanks to Katja Gloggengiesser for all the great illustrations! Kudos to our early readers Christine Maßloch and Ramona Braddock Buck for the feedback and to Mario Lucero for inspiring us by his artwork.

Next we want also to thank all the participants who guided us with their questions and discussions in the right direction. Kudos to the workshop participants at: Agile 2016 and the ones from Agile India 2017: Vipin Agarwal, Syed Shabid Ali, Ravi P Ayyar, R Muni Yugandar Babu, Chandrakanth Biradar, Lalatendu Das, Sharath Desai, Manish Dureja, Thiyagarajan G G, Srikanth Ganugapati, Hari Iyer, Prasad Kabbur, Tarek Kaddoumi, Vijaya Kalluri, Satish Khot, Hari Kiran, Suneetha Konda, Guruprasad Krishnan, Seema Kumar, Ganesh T M, Sandy Mamoli, Shweta Mohindru, Uma Naidu, Sita Pun CSM, Divya Rajanna, Suman Ramaswamy, Mr. Shrey Razdan, Vasudevan A S, Balaji Sathram, Prashanth Shidlaghatta, Sunit Sinha, Surender Subramanian, Uday Tiwari, Mihir Ranjan Tripathy, Rajiv Tuli, Jatinder Verma, Chandar VR.

And finally we acknowledge our partners Ramona Braddock Buck and Nicolai Josuttis for their patience and ongoing support.

Beyond Budgeting Principles

From Beyond Budgeting:

  1. Purpose – Engage and inspire people around bold and noble causes; not around short term financial targets
  2. Values – Govern through shared values and sound judgement; not through detailed rules and regulations
  3. Transparency – Make information open for self-regulation, innovation, learning and control; don’t restrict it
  4. Organisation – Cultivate a strong sense of belonging and organise around accountable teams; avoid hierarchical control and bureaucracy
  5. Autonomy – Trust people with freedom to act; don’t punish everyone if someone should abuse it
  6. Customers – Connect everyone’s work with customer needs; avoid conflicts of interest
  7. Rhythm – Organise management processes dynamically around business rhythms and events; not around the calendar year only
  8. Targets – Set directional, ambitious and relative goals; avoid fixed and cascaded targets
  9. Plans and forecasts – Make planning and forecasting lean and unbiased processes; not rigid and political exercises
  10. Resource allocation – Foster a cost conscious mind-set and make resources available as needed; not through detailed annual budget allocations
  11. Performance evaluation – Evaluate performance holistically and with peer feedback for learning and development; not based on measurements and not for rewards only
  12. Rewards – Reward shared success against competition; not against fixed performance contracts
Open Space Principles

From Wikipedia on Open Space:

  1. Whoever comes is the right people …reminds participants that they don’t need the CEO and 100 people to get something done, you need people who care. And, absent the direction or control exerted in a traditional meeting, that’s who shows up in the various breakout sessions of an Open Space meeting.
  2. Whenever it starts is the right time …reminds participants that “spirit and creativity do not run on the clock.”
  3. Wherever it is, is the right place …reminds participants that space is opening everywhere all the time. Please be conscious and aware.
  4. Whatever happens is the only thing that could have, be prepared to be surprised! …reminds participants that once something has happened, it’s done—and no amount of fretting, complaining or otherwise rehashing can change that. Move on. The second part reminds us that it is all good.
  5. When it’s over, it’s over (within this session) …reminds participants that we never know how long it will take to resolve an issue, once raised, but that whenever the issue or work or conversation is finished, move on to the next thing. Don’t keep rehashing just because there’s 30 minutes left in the session. Do the work, not the time.

In addition to these five principles there is a law available, called the “Law of Two Feet”: If at any time during our time together you find yourself in any situation where you are neither learning nor contributing, use your two feet, go someplace else.

Sociocracy Principles

From Sociocracy:

  1. Consent: The Principle of Consent dictates that each policy decision (in which we make or change the rules by which we play) is made by consent. Consent is not consensus — it does not mean that everyone agrees. It means that nobody is aware of a risk that we cannot afford to take. We know we have made a decision by consent when somebody (usually the facilitator) asks “Can you see any risks we cannot afford to take in adopting this proposal?” If each participant in the meeting indicates they do not see any risks we cannot afford to take, we have made a decision by consent to try out the experiment described in that proposal. If policies are the rules of the game, then operations are “playing the game.” While we only make policy decisions by consent, we can make operational decisions however the rules tell us to. Most often, this means very clear delegation of budgets and decisions to specific roles and assigning people to those roles.
  2. Circles: The Principle of Circles tells us that a sociocratic organization is made up of circles – semi-autonomous, selforganizing teams that each make their own membership decisions, decide on their own working methods, and manage their own budgets. Each circle defines its policy (and some policies which apply to other circles reporting to it) by consent, and uses other decision-making methods as appropriate to its operational work. The key to the Principle of Circles is that each circle is organized around delivering a specific type of value to a specific client (inside or outside the organization). A circle for an orchard would include growers, truckers, sales people, and accountants — or at least the people managing sub-circles devoted to those areas of work. Each specific type of value is known as an aim.
  3. Feedback: The Principle of Feedback requires us to use feedback processes everywhere in our work, and especially in the power structure of the organization. While most companies have a top-down organizational structure, with managers providing links from one level of the organization down to the one below, those “single links” are often choke points for key information that people on the front lines know and the “top management” do not. Sociocratic organizations use “double links” to connect each circle with the one above it. The operational leader role provides guidance and prioritization from the higher circle to one below it, especially during normal operations. The representative role provides feedback and guidance from the lower circle to the one it reports to. While the representatives may not have any operational responsibilities in the higher of their two circles, they (along with the operational leader) are full members of both circles for the purpose of any consent decision-making.
  4. Election: The Principle of Election by Consent provides an important counter-balance. While we can delegate almost any decision to operational roles or processes, using a policy decision made with consent, the one sort of decision we cannot delegate is the election of an important role — particularly the representative. Representatives must be chosen by consent of the circle which they represent. This ensures that the organization is woven together by a web of consent, and that power flows in circles through the entire organization.
Agile Principles

From the Agile Manifesto: We are uncovering better ways of developing software by doing it and helping others do it. Through this work we have come to value:

• Individuals and interactions over processes and tools
• Working software over comprehensive documentation
• Customer collaboration over contract negotiation
• Responding to change over following a plan

That is, while there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more.

Again from the Agile Manifesto: We follow these principles:

  1.  Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software.
  2. Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes harness change for the customer’s competitive advantage.
  3. Deliver working software frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with a preference to the shorter timescale.
  4. Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project.
  5. Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done.
  6. The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation.
  7. Working software is the primary measure of progress.
  8. Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace indefinitely.
  9. Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility.
  10. Simplicity–the art of maximizing the amount of work not done–is essential.
  11. The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organizing teams.
  12. At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, then tunes and adjusts its behavior accordingly.

For Part I – Gathering the Band

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For Part II – Improvising the Tune

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For Part III – Shall We Dance?

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For Part IV – Party Time

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For Part I – Gathering the Band
For Part II – Improvising the Tune
For Part III – Shall We Dance?
For Part IV – Party Time